Historic Seattle - 2017 Outstanding Modern Preservation Award

Congratulations to the whole Team and a huge thanks to Historic Seattle for the the recognition of the Robert Reichert House and Studio with the 2017 Outstanding Modern Preservation award last night!

 

Project team:

Clients : Reichert Studio
Heidi and Darin

Contractor: Dboone Construction
Dave Boone Project manager, Luke Marcum Site super

Architect : CAST architecture
Stefan Hampden, principal  & Brian Campbell, associate.

Structural Engineer: TSE Engineering
Keith Ryan PE

Envelope Engineer: RDH building Science inc
Dan Rundle

 

 

Historic Seattle - 2017 Outstanding Modern Preservation Award

Historic Seattle - 2017 Outstanding Modern Preservation Award

historic seattle awards 2017 - team.jpg

Abridged project team at the awards left to right : Luke, Dave, Stefan, Darin, Heidi and Jeffrey 

Historic Seattle Dinner and awards ceremony at Washington Hall.

Historic Seattle Dinner and awards ceremony at Washington Hall.

New stucco facade of the Reichert House & Studio complete with shadow paintings

New stucco facade of the Reichert House & Studio complete with shadow paintings

Interior stairs with view of "door to heaven"

Interior stairs with view of "door to heaven"

Retooled entry of completed project

Retooled entry of completed project

Should I Stay or Should I Go

 

"Should I stay or should I go now?
Should I stay or should I go now?
If I go there will be trouble
An' if I stay it will be double
So come on and let me know …
Should I stay or should I go?"   - The Clash

Ahh, the question that keeps re-modelers awake at night. It may seem like an achievable idea but trying to maintain a normal lifestyle in the middle of a construction zone is a test for most families. Before you commit to this restless journey we encourage you to consider the following complications. 

 

A general breakdown of the positives and negatives of remaining in your home. 

Positives

  • Save the cost of renting
  • Avoid the hassle of relocating your family and items

Negatives

  • Rise and Shine - Construction days start early
  • Construction is Dirty Business - Prepare for dust and debris
  • Restricted Area - Limited access to parts of your home
  • Black Out - System upgrades will require coordination and may be inconvenient
  • Time is Money - Any delays in schedule will increase the project's price tag
  • Power Tools are not Subtle - Construction sites are extremely noisy
  • Health Concerns - Every remodel comes with a certain amount of risk of exposure to lead and asbestos, especially in older homes

 

Also of consideration when living in a construction zone is the associated health risks. The severity of this exposure is dependent on several factors including how well the construction area can be sealed and the age of the home being renovated. Homes that pre-date the 1970's are extremely likely to contain lead paint which can pose serious health hazards; especially for young children. If the area of remodel can be completely quarantined then it's worth further consideration, but if your separation plan is a thin plastic sheet, start packing your bags. 

The final significant consideration is all about you; well your sanity. You will have an exclusive front row seat to the destruction and chaos occurring in your own home. Yes, you are excited about a transformation but being privy to the raw construction process may result in more stress than intrigue. This again is dependent on the level of compartmentalization achievable and your temperament. 

If you are asking our opinion here it is - if you have kids, and are renovating your kitchen plus a few other spaces - GO. If you are not remodeling with children in tow and the area of construction can be sectioned off then consider staying. The potential for monetary savings is limited but the metal taxation is real so take some time to think about the trade-offs. 

 

Still can't decide? Use the diagram below to figure out your situation. 

 
 

Stong support for more Backyard Cottages

Wow, strong support for all of the changes to the DADU / backyard cottage code!

Last night, CM Mike O'Brien and Nick Walsh from the city planning office had an open house to take the temperature of the community with regards to a series of incremental revisions to the DADU code.  Some of the proposed changes on the table, plus results from the straw poll as of the beginning of the meeting: 

25 for/ 9 against eliminating the owner occupancy requirement

23 for /6 against allowing a DADU and an ADU on the same lot (and possibly change the number of unrelated persons allowed to live on an Single Family lot.  

14 for / 5 against /13 maybes for Increasing the Rear Yard Coverage allowed

28 for/4 against eliminating the parking requirement

I didn't get the tallies for the height limit increase and other development standard improvments but they were also supported by a plurality.  

The reception was generally positive and civil, and more importantly according to the straw vote for the various measured, there was overwhelming support for all of the provisions.  

Next open house is 6 pm, February 3rd at the Wallingford Community Center.